A person-centred care plan focused on improving quality of life

We need

  • Care of all patients with heart failure to be patient-led, with shared decision-making between health care professionals and patients and their families at every stage of their care, including end-of-life (palliative) care where appropriate
  • Therapeutic education programmes to help engage patients in self-care. These programmes should span the hospital and community settings, be tailored to each patient’s needs and aspirations, and be allocated specific funding to ensure they get implemented appropriately.

Why

  • Person-centred approaches in heart failure such as shared decision making and personalised care planning have been shown to be effective in shortening hospital stays,1 improving quality of life and morbidity2 and reducing patient uncertainty and confusion.3
  • Effective self-management is critical to help patients achieve good health outcomes, prevent re-admission to hospital and thereby improve patients’ quality of life.4
  • Appropriate information and support to patients (therapeutic education) has been shown keep patients out of hospital and improve their quality of life.5

Examples of what has been done:

  • Ekman I, Wolf A, Olsson L-E, et al. Effects of person-centred care in patients with chronic heart failure: the PCC-HF study. European heart journal 2011.

  • Brannstrom M, Boman K. Effects of person-centred and integrated chronic heart failure and palliative home care. PREFER: a randomized controlled study. Eur J Heart Fail 2014;16(10):1142-51.

  • Dudas K, Olsson LE, Wolf A, et al. Uncertainty in illness among patients with chronic heart failure is less in person-centred care than in usual care. European journal of cardiovascular nursing : journal of the Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology 2013;12(6):521-8.

  • Jaarsma T, Stromberg A, Ben Gal T, et al. Comparison of self-care behaviors of heart failure patients in 15 countries worldwide. Patient education and counseling 2013;92(1):114-20.

  • Jaarsma T, Stromberg A, Ben Gal T, et al. Comparison of self-care behaviors of heart failure patients in 15 countries worldwide. Patient education and counseling 2013;92(1):114-20.

    Stromberg A. The crucial role of patient education in heart failure. Eur J Heart Fail 2005;7(3):363-9.

  • World Heart Federation. Global CVD Roadmaps - reducing cardiovascular premature mortality through secondary prevention interventions. Secondary Global CVD Roadmaps - reducing cardiovascular premature mortality through secondary prevention interventions 2015. http://www.cvdroadmaps.org/roadmap/a-roadmap-for-reducing-cardiovascular-premature-mortality-through-secondary#map-count-9.

  • Stromberg A. The crucial role of patient education in heart failure. Eur J Heart Fail 2005;7(3):363-9.

  • Juillière Y, Jourdain P, Roncalli J, et al. Therapeutic education unit for heart failure: Setting-up and difficulties. Initial evaluation of the I-CARE programme. Archives of Cardiovascular Disease 2009;102:19-27.

  • McMurray JJ, Adamopoulos S, Anker SD, et al. ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure 2012. European journal of heart failure 2012;14(8):803-69

  • Ponikowski P, Anker S, AlHabib K, et al. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide. : European Society of Cardiology., 2014.